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Monster Employment Index: Schweden

Monster Employment Index: Schweden

September 2009 Index Highlights:

  • The Monster Employment Index Sweden jumped four points (four percent) in September, the first monthly increase since February 2009.
  • The media/marketing, sales and production sectors noted the sharpest gains in online job availability.
  • Online job demand increased across all Swedish regions.

Summary Overview

September marked the first increase in Swedish online job offerings since February, with opportunities climbing four percent. Areas such as media and sales reported a surge in offerings which helped fuel the overall uptick. However, the annual rate of decline deteriorated in September; as opportunities were down 39 percent compared to September 2008, suggesting underlying employer demand for workers remains muted.

About The Monster Employment Index Europe

The Monster Employment Index Europe provides monthly insight into online recruitment trends across the European Union. Launched in June 2005 with data from December 2004, the Index is based on a review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large, representative selection of corporate career sites and job boards, including Monster. The Monster Employment Index’s underlying data is validated for accuracy by Research America, Inc. – an independent, third-party auditing firm – to ensure that measured online job recruitment activity is within a margin of error of +/- 1.05%.

The Index monitors online job opportunities across all European Union member countries.

The monthly reports for Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom and Europe are available at: http://about-monster.com/employment/index/17.

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